• Modern standards of insulation should ensure you don't experience condensation. Even then, however, some normal daily activities produce a great deal of water vapour which can cause condensation around the home. Condensation is steam or water vapour which reverts to water on contact with a cold surface. As with moisture from construction, it can sometimes cause mould on walls and ceilings, especially in unventilated corners behind cupboards and wardrobes. If allowed to persist, condensation and mould can damage clothes, bedding, floor coverings, decorations and the home itself. Next to shrinkage, condensation is the most common problem in newly constructed homes. The following guidelines will help reduce these risks, particularly during the drying out period:
  • A low level of heating should be maintained at all times during the drying out period. Even when this period is over it is advisable to maintain the temperature at a low level, or set the time clock so that your home has preheated before you return. A house which is continually occupied or maintained at a warm temperature is less conducive to generating condensation.
  • Do not use portable gas heaters instead of the installed heating system. These supplementary heaters create a great deal of water vapour when burning. 
  • Tumble dryers should be self-condensing or vented externally. 
  • Keep ventilators open and try to safely leave windows ajar. 
  • In the kitchen and bedroom, you will need more ventilation as more steam is produced in these areas. Your home is provided with an extractor fan or hood and ductwork from the kitchen and bathroom will operate when required. You need to ensure that the isolator switches for these systems are left on at all times. Additionally, the fans should be left running until any noticeable vapour has cleared.
  • Cover pans when cooking to reduce steam.
  • Avoid drying clothes indoors over radiators.